A Step-by-Step Guide to Obtaining Your OSHA 10 Certification

07/10, 2024 - Dreams Design

Building the structures that define our communities may provide a sense of success, making a career out of construction work very fulfilling. But, achieving professional success in construction is rarely an easy feat. For skyscrapers to remain tall, exact computations are required. Similarly, construction workers must possess excellent safety knowledge for a long-lasting career. The gateway toward a satisfying career in construction is earning your OSHA construction certification.

In October 2021, there were 402,000 open vacancies in the construction industry, the second-highest number since data collection began in December 2000. This indicates a severe labor shortage in the sector. Construction organizations with difficulty attracting and retaining a steady staff may find that offering workers an OSHA 10 online course might help them acquire in-demand safety skills.

The construction business thrives on a tiered structure of expertise. OSHA 10 construction safety training establishes the foundation for obtaining advanced safety abilities. After completing an OSHA 10-hour course, specialization can lead to leadership and supervisory responsibilities as well as the chance to create a safe culture that benefits your entire workforce. With the aid of this comprehensive guide, you will be able to successfully complete the OSHA 10 training, putting you in a position to succeed and be safe in the construction sector.

1. Who Needs OSHA 10 Certification?

Let's break down the key factors to determine if the OSHA 10 course is right for you:

● Construction Jobs Demanding This Safety Training
While not universally mandatory, the OSHA 10 construction training course is strongly recommended for various construction trades. The program's comprehensive safety training can significantly benefit workers involved in general construction activities like framing, roofing, and electrical work. 

Additionally, specific construction sectors might have stricter requirements.  For instance, workers in lead renovation, asbestos abatement, or confined space entry often need OSHA 10 construction worker training. It serves as a foundation for further specialized training.

● Project-Specific Requirements
Even within the construction industry, individual project specifications might mandate OSHA 10-hour training for all workers on the job site. This is particularly common for large-scale construction projects such as bridges, tunnels, demolition, excavation in deep trenches, or skyscrapers. The complexity of the work and potential safety hazards require a heightened focus on safety protocols.

In some cases, project contracts or bidding requirements might explicitly state that OSHA construction safety training is a mandatory qualification for workers. This is more common for government-funded projects.

● Employer Requirements
A lot of construction companies favor OSHA 10-hour training.  You obtain a competitive advantage in the employment market by showcasing your proactive approach to safety. Employers may even provide incentives like faster promotion prospects or greater starting salary.

● OSHA 10 Requirements for Enrollment
Enrolling in an OSHA 10 course usually has simple eligibility requirements.  Participants in most programs must be at least eighteen years old. There is no need for prior safety expertise because OSHA 10 offers basic training.

2. Choosing the Right OSHA 10 Training


● Classroom vs. Online Training: Finding the Best Fit
Classroom Training:
Strengths: Facilitates important in-person interactions between students and teachers, encouraging prompt queries, conversations, and networking possibilities. In-person instruction is also superior to experiential learning since it gives you the chance to practice safety protocols and get feedback on your methods.

Considerations: It may demand attendance in a physical place at specified times, which could be difficult for people with hectic schedules or those who have long commutes. Due to travel and possible housing expenses, in-person instruction may also be more expensive.

Online Training:
Strengths: Unbeatable convenience and flexibility. Great for self-paced learners or those with busy schedules, as you can access course materials and study at your own pace with an internet connection. No travel or accommodation costs.

Considerations: Insufficient engagement with educators and colleagues may impede professional development opportunities. The hands-on learning opportunities provided by in-person classrooms may be replaced with videos or simulations in online courses.

● Choosing a Top-Notch OSHA 10 Outreach Training Provider

Here are some key factors to consider:

OSHA Authorization: Ensure OSHA's Outreach Training Program authorizes the construction worker training provider. You can verify this by checking if the provider is listed on OSHA's website under "Find a Trainer" or belongs to the OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers network.

Effectiveness Measurement: An effective OSHA 10-hour class would incorporate assessments, tests, or completion certificates to verify knowledge retention and program success. Seek instructors who provide tests or hands-on activities during the course to assess comprehension and pinpoint areas in which you might require more assistance.

Instructor Qualifications: Look for teachers with a track record of success in construction safety when selecting an OSHA 10 construction training course provider. They ought to have worked in construction safety for at least five years. Experience may occasionally be replaced by occupational safety and health degrees from colleges or by certificates such as CSP (Certified Safety Professional) or CIH (Certified Industrial Hygienist).

Most importantly, instructors should be authorized OSHA trainers. Legitimate providers will have instructors who have completed OSHA's trainer course (#500) to learn the best ways to teach safety to workers.

OSHA Authorization: Ensure OSHA's Outreach Training Program authorizes the construction worker training provider. You can verify this by checking if the provider is listed on OSHA's website under "Find a Trainer" or belongs to the OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers network.

Effectiveness Measurement: An effective OSHA 10-hour class would incorporate assessments, tests, or completion certificates to verify knowledge retention and program success. Seek instructors who provide tests or hands-on activities during the course to assess comprehension and pinpoint areas in which you might require more assistance.

Instructor Qualifications: Look for teachers with a track record of success in construction safety when selecting an OSHA 10 construction training course provider. They ought to have worked in construction safety for at least five years. Experience may occasionally be replaced by occupational safety and health degrees from colleges or by certificates such as CSP (Certified Safety Professional) or CIH (Certified Industrial Hygienist).

Most importantly, instructors should be authorized OSHA trainers. Legitimate providers will have instructors who have completed OSHA's trainer course (#500) to learn the best ways to teach safety to workers.

● Finding OSHA 10 Training in Your Language
While OSHA 10 online courses are typically offered in English and Spanish only, classroom training offers greater language accessibility. Many authorized trainers provide OSHA 10 certification courses in Spanish, French, Mandarin, Russian, Korean, German, Hindi, etc.

3. Steps to Obtaining Your OSHA 10 Certification


● Step 1: Research
Find an OSHA-approved training provider and get started. Choose the format that works for you based on your budget, schedule, and learning style.

● Step 2: Enroll
Once you have chosen a provider and format, enroll in the OSHA 10-hour course.  Usually, this involves providing your name, email, and payment method.  Some providers may offer discounts for early enrollment or group registration.

● Step 3: Attend Training Sessions
It's essential that you take part actively in the program.  The OSHA 10 course, whether taken in person or online, will cover key safety principles, laws, and best practices for reducing workplace risks. The course covers subjects that are divided into required, elective, and optional categories:

Mandatory Topics (6 hours):
i. Introduction to OSHA (filing complaints, employer responsibilities, workers' rights)
ii. Hazard Communication
iii. Walking and Working Surfaces, including Fall Protection 
iv. Electrical 
v. Exit Routes, Fire Prevention Plans, and Fire Protection, Emergency Action Plans
vi. Personal Protective Equipment and Lifesaving Equipment

Elective Topics (2 hours - minimum of two, 30 minutes each):
These topics allow instructors to tailor the training to specific industry needs or address common hazards in your region. Here are some potential elective topics:
vii. Hazardous Materials
viii. Materials Handling
ix. Machine Guarding
x. Introduction to Industrial Hygiene
xi. Bloodborne Pathogens
xii. Ergonomics
xiii. Safety and Health Program
xiv. Fall Protection

When choosing an OSHA 10 training provider, ask what electives they offer to make sure they cover what you need and want.

● Step 4: Complete Course Requirements
Most OSHA 10-hour training programs have a final exam, a multiple-choice test. You must score 70% or better to pass the exam and get your certification.

● Step 5: Receive Your Certification
Once you complete the course and pass the final exam, you'll get an official OSHA 10 Construction Certification card from the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL). This card is a valuable document of your safety training and can be a big plus when applying for construction jobs.


Some training providers offer OSHA 10 courses that award Continuing Education Units (CEUs) upon completion. CEUs can be helpful in maintaining professional licenses or certifications in specific fields. Ask your training provider if they offer CEUs before you sign up if this is important to you.

4. OSHA 10 Maintenance and Renewal

The OSHA 10 card itself doesn't have an expiration date, but some employers, especially in high-risk industries, may require periodic refresher training every 3-5 years. Even without employer mandates, staying current on safety regulations and best practices is important for your safety and your colleagues

Conclusion


In the big picture of the construction industry, where one dropped wrench or one misstep can unravel years of planning, the importance of a skilled and safe workforce can't be overstated.  While OSHA 10 construction safety training serves as a foundational pillar, it is merely the first course in a lifelong pursuit of safety mastery.
 
Putting money into a continuous safety education culture protects not just individual workers but also the future of construction as a whole. This results in a measurable increase in productivity and resilience within the industry. It's simple to make this decision: put safety first or risk endangering the health of your employees and the stability of the industry at large. Enroll your team in LearnTastic's OSHA construction certification course today and unlock the competitive advantage that comes with a safety-first approach.